Mohd. Shazani bin Masri

MOHD. SHAZANI MASRI

M Sc., LSE, 2013

BA (Hons), Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010

shazani

Major Interest Areas:

  • Political theory
  • Political economics
  • Islamic economics and finance
  • Political Islam

Email:

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Website:

(if available)

Contact number:

+6082-584010 (Office)

   

Selected Publication(s):

  • “Islamic Soteriology and Politics: An Inquiry to Muslims’ Worldview on Salvation in Its Practical Islamic Political Discourse in Malaysia,”(hyperlink to full paper) Conference on Elections and Democracy 2011 in Malaysia, UNIMAS, Kota Samarahan MALAYSIA (Presented, November 2011)

He is a lecturer at Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS), Malaysia. He has special interests in Political Islam, Islam and the West, and Southeast Asian politics, Islamic economics and finance, and theories of land, agency and poverty. He is currently involved in Needs Analysis research project under Center of Excellence for Rural Informatics (CoERI), UNIMAS to build internet telecenters for poverty-stricken Orang Asli at various locations in Peninsular Malaysia. (50 – 150 words of self-introduction)

Curriculum Vitae (hyperlink to personal CV)

Dayang Hajyrayati

Dayang Hajyrayati bt. Awang Kassim

Picture 003

 

I attended University of Malaya for my bachelor’s degree, majoring in Southeast Asian Studies with a minor in Anthropology and Sociology. Broadly speaking, my areas of interest include indigenous knowledge, livelihood strategy and Borneo ethnography.  

Sharifah Sophia

Sharifah Sophia

Sharifah Sophia has been a member of the Department since 2011. She graduated from Durham University in 2010, with a thesis on autobiography and post-colonialism. Her research interests are in colonial experience, history of ideas and sociology of knowledge. She runs the faculty's Reading Circle, a grassroots' initiative which is now growing in terms of activities and membership. Initially operated underground, it now comes under the jurisdiction of the Faculty's Research portfolio. Lacks any real artistic talent, she prefers listening to Rachmaninoff's concerto than watching Wimbledon or Armageddon. She is now studying the history of Sarawak Museum by applying post-structural method and insight

Tracy Peter Samat

Tracy Peter Samat

 

Tracy halfbody

 

 

I was graduated with Bachelor of Arts (Hons.) from University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur in 2004, major in Southeast Asia Studies and minor in history. In 2012, I was awarded with Master of Arts in Anthropology from Latrobe University, Australia. My Master thesis was on ethnic tourism and the Bidayuh people looking at the implications of ethnic tourism for the formation and expression of Bidayuh cultural identity. I started my career as a lecturer in 2007 where I was first employed as a tutor. During the years of my service, I have involved with few researches concerning the indigenous community in Sarawak such as Pengetahuan tempatan dalam pembangunan masyarakat Bidayuh Bisitang, Siburan in 2007-2008 and Risiko Kemiskinan di Penempatan semula Sungai Asap, Belaga in 2007 – 2008. Apart from that, I was also involved in the project funded by Economic Planning Unit (EPU) on the Needs Analysis in Developing Telecentre in Long Lamai, Penan settlement in 2007-2008 and Needs Analysis in Developing Telecentre in Pos Gob, Pos Balar, Pos Lenjang & Pos Sinderut, Orang Asli settlements in 2011-2012. My research interests include the development and issues in ethnic and cultural tourism; primarily but not limited to the preservation of Bidayuh traditions and cultures, indigenous knowledge in ethnic tourism and issue on tourism channels and the information displayed.

 

I was graduated with Bachelor of Arts (Hons.) from University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur in 2004, major in Southeast Asia Studies and minor in history. In 2012, I was awarded with Master of Arts in Anthropology from Latrobe University, Australia. My Master thesis was on ethnic tourism and the Bidayuh people looking at the implications of ethnic tourism for the formation and expression of Bidayuh cultural identity. I started my career as a lecturer in 2007 where I was first employed as a tutor. During the years of my service, I have involved with few researches concerning the indigenous community in Sarawak such as   Pengetahuan tempatan dalam pembangunan masyarakat Bidayuh Bisitang, Siburan in 2007-2008 and Risiko Kemiskinan di Penempatan semula Sungai Asap, Belaga in 2007 – 2008. Apart from that, I was also involved in the project funded by Economic Planning Unit (EPU) on the Needs Analysis in Developing Telecentre in Long Lamai, Penan settlement in 2007-2008 and Needs Analysis in Developing Telecentre in Pos Gob, Pos Balar, Pos Lenjang & Pos Sinderut, Orang Asli settlements in 2011-2012. My research interests include the development and issues in ethnic and cultural tourism; primarily but not limited to the preservation of Bidayuh traditions and cultures, indigenous knowledge in ethnic tourism and issue on tourism channels and the information displayed.

Poline Bala

Poline Bala

Ph.D (Cambridge)

M.A. (Cornell)

B.A (Hons) (Universiti Malaya)

Because of my interdiscplinarian background, my research interests are also quite broad. Foremost is the anthropology of Bornean societies. This includes the emergence and development of the international borders on the island of Borneo and its implication on kinship relations and nation-building processes in Central Borneo. Of particular interest here is the development of national identities at the border areas.

I am also interested in political ethnography – governance structures and local leadership patterns among rural and small communities, and how these patterns are changing with the penetration of new ideologies (modernization, democracy and election) into rural areas. Conversely, how these new ideologies have been adopted and adapted by small communities into their own political, economic and socio-cultural contexts.

For the last 13 years I have been making sense of the term “development” especially in rural and remote contexts of Malaysia. As it is, the term development is one of the most contentious terms in modern time. It means different thing for different people. Having said that, my particular interest is applied anthropology. My aim is to offer the anthropological perspective - a view of humanity grounded in a tradition of cross-cultural scholarship and action – in the area of community development. I work to design, plan and implement community development projects using community or people-centred approach, asset based community development and participative techniques. Together with this is an increasing interest in the emerging field of society and technology. This is especially with regards to the interplay between technologies (i.e information communication technologies), government policies and strategies for development intervention. Using broad social impact approach, I conduct impact studies to assess non-technical outcomes of technology-based development in rural areas.

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